If you’ve been following me on Twitter, or you’ve read my recent blog post about women that inspire me, you’ll know I’ve been listening to a LOT of episodes of the Ctrl Alt Delete podcast. One theme that seems to come up again and again is the theme of jealousy, and whether or not creative people with creative friends are jealous of and compete with each other. Time after time, Emma’s amazing guests have declared that of course they don’t feel jealous of their other blogger/writer friends. Which is nice, obviously. In a world where women are constantly pitted against each other, it’s nice to see women building each other up and supporting each other. But it got me thinking about the nature of jealousy, and whether or not it’s always a bad thing. Because whilst it’s not healthy to constantly be pining after someone else’s life, or to be jealous…

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Lots of things in life are gendered. Clothes. Children’s toys. Razors. Something that’s not talked about often, however, is the gendered nature of food. But when you think about it, so much food is gendered. Salad? Female. Steaks? Male. Chocolate? Female. Peanuts? Male. Wine? Female. Beer? Male. Like most things in society, the gendered nature of food is totally unnecessary. Of course women can eat steak and men can eat chocolate. Of course there are women who will happily drink 3 pints and men who love a good caesar salad. It is, however, not surprising that food is gendered. Or at least, it’s not surprising that food is gendered the way it is. See, there’s a stereotype that women prefer healthy food. So while they’re flocking to Sainsbury’s to buy leaves and low-calorie dressing, the men are greedily chomping on cheeseburgers and washing them down with cans of lager. And…

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I’ve never had a hero. When people ask me who my role models and heroes are, I usually mumble something about my mother and Emmeline Pankhurst, but in my head I’m thinking ‘I have no bloody clue.’ See, the thing about role models and heroes is that people think they should encompass everything you want to be in life. Which, when you think about it, is a lot to ask from one person. It’s no wonder that YouTubers and celebrities crumble under the pressure of being someone’s role model. Nobody is perfect, and putting anybody up on a pedestal for being the Ultimate Human is dangerous – for both the hero and the worshiper. That being said, I do think it’s important to have people that inspire and motivate you. So today I thought I’d share with you some of the women who inspire me. On their own, none of…

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On Saturday 21st January, women all around the world marched in protest against Donald Trump’s inauguration, the rise of fascism in the West, and a whole host of other social justice issues. It was a powerful moment, one I’m glad to have witnessed, albeit from Twitter rather than from one of the actual marches. It was, however, not perfect. Following the march, I saw a lot of criticisms for it being trans-exclusionary, inaccessible to disabled people, and generally centred largely around white women. These are valid and extremely important criticisms. However, a lot of women who attended the marches are angry that they’ve been called out for being less than perfect. And you can’t blame them. Earlier this month, I wrote about how to call someone out when they’re being problematic as hell. What I didn’t talk about, however, was what to do if you get called out for being…

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I have a confession to make. I started my blog to make money. When I published my first post back in 2014, somewhere in the back of my mind I thought ‘I really want to make this my job’. It’s taboo to say it, I know. I’m supposed to say that I started blogging because of my passion for writing. To say that I don’t care about the views and the stats. To say that I’m not frustrated that I’m 2 years into blogging and I’ve not made a dime. But that’s not true. Or at least, it’s only part of the truth. I did start blogging because I have a passion for writing, and for the things I write about. But I also started blogging because I’d seen other women make a career out of it and I thought, ‘Hey, maybe I could do that.’ And I don’t think…

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