I feel like 2016 was the year that the body confidence movement really took off. Everywhere I turned last year people were talking about body confidence. I can only hope that trend continues into 2017 and beyond. What’s rarely talked about when it comes to body confidence, however, is sex. We focus all our energy on encouraging people to feel beautiful, but we never encourage people to feel sexy. Probably because the body confidence movement is primarily (or at least should be primarily) centred around fat people. And we all know fat people couldn’t possibly be sexy or desirable, right?! Feeling desirable and sexy is something I personally struggle with a lot. Cute? Sure. Attractive? Of course! But sexy? Never. I think there are many reasons why people – women in particular – might struggle to feel sexy, even if their body confidence is through the roof. For a start, women…

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Earlier on in Blogmas, I challenged myself to find out more about periods and what the fuck goes on with my body every month. Cos, y’know, I figured I should probably understand more biology a bit better. While researching that post, I stumbled across some information about hormones and the female hormone cycle, and I realised that there’s a lot more going on with my body than I thought. So today I thought I’d delve a little deeper into the female hormone cycle, and hopefully share some information with others who may be in the dark like me. What the fuck are hormones? If, like me, GCSE biology was a while ago, you may not be entirely sure what a hormone actually is.  Well, according to BBC Bitesize (AKA the whole reason I passed my GCSEs in the first place), hormones are chemical substances that help to regulate processes in…

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Last week on the blog, I wrote about some things I had learned about sexuality and the history of sex and marriage when I studied a module at university called Sexualities in History. I also mentioned that the module had challenged me a lot and made me reconsider a lot of things I thought I knew about sex, sexuality, and marriage. So today I thought I’d share with you some of the myths about the history of sex and marriage that the module debunked for me. 1. Sex only happened within marriage Before I properly studied sex, sexuality, and marriage, I was generally under the belief that, historically, sex had been pretty much confined to marriage – particularly in medieval England where the Church’s control was so absolute. Of course, I wasn’t naive enough to believe that no one had sex outside of marriage, but I assumed that most people followed…

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I first got my period when I was 11 – one month before I received any information about what a period actually was. I remember it clearly. It was August, and I was on holiday with my family in Wales. Thanks to some secretive Googling, I was vaguely away of what was happening to me – but I wasn’t sure what to do or how to talk about it. So I hid the evidence and waited for my mother to confront me when I got home. She gave me a pack of sanitary towels and sent me on my way – and I’ve been merrily having periods ever since. Recently, however, I realised that although I’ve been having periods for 10 years now, I still don’t really know anything about them. Sure, I know that once a month (or once every two months if I run two packs of my…

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In my final year of university, I took a module called Sexualities in History, which explored all aspects of sexuality – from homosexuality, to sex work, to pornography, and more – across different periods of history around the world. It was hands down one of my favourite modules of my entire degree, and it really challenged me and the way I thought about sex and sexuality. Today I thought I’d share with you five of the (many) things I learned throughout the course of the module – some of which you may know, some of which you may not. Sexuality is natural… or is it? Being of the liberal persuasion, I was always a firm believer in the idea that human beings were born with their sexualities. For some people, that sexuality is heterosexual; for some, homosexual; for others, bisexual; and for others still, asexual (plus a whole host of…

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