Last week on the blog, I wrote about some things I had learned about sexuality and the history of sex and marriage when I studied a module at university called Sexualities in History. I also mentioned that the module had challenged me a lot and made me reconsider a lot of things I thought I knew about sex, sexuality, and marriage. So today I thought I’d share with you some of the myths about the history of sex and marriage that the module debunked for me. 1. Sex only happened within marriage Before I properly studied sex, sexuality, and marriage, I was generally under the belief that, historically, sex had been pretty much confined to marriage – particularly in medieval England where the Church’s control was so absolute. Of course, I wasn’t naive enough to believe that no one had sex outside of marriage, but I assumed that most people followed…

View Post
Share:

// Trigger warning for mention of abortion // Everybody’s entitled to their opinion, man. I can say what I want – it’s free speech dude! How many times have you heard that bullshit phrase? If you’re an opinionated woman or minority who spends any time online, I’m willing to bet the answer is ‘a lot’. See, bigots and racists and other unsavoury people like to flaunt their horrific ideals around, and then cry ‘FREE SPEECH’ when someone (usually a woman) tries to criticise them. In fact, there’s a popular belief on the internet that everything – and I mean everything – is up for discussion; that all opinions are good and valuable and should be heard. Nowhere is this line of thinking more apparent than on the internet, where people like to tell you that there’s no such thing as a moral fact – that nothing is simply black or…

View Post
Share:

YouTube is a huge phenomenon these days. The art of vlogging (that is, video-blogging) your life, thoughts, ideas, whatever, is immensely popular, particularly with young people. Many YouTubers amass millions of followers, millions of viewers, and million (okay, perhaps a slight exaggeration for most) of pounds. ‘Professional YouTuber’ is now a full-time job title that many people have claimed. Take Zoe ‘Zoella’ Sugg, for instance. Even if you don’t watch her videos, chances are you’ve probably heard her name. She’s Traditional Media’s go-to reference for all things YouTube related. Not only is Zoe one of the most popular YouTubers ever, but she was also one of the first YouTubers to release a book. Not just any old book, mind you. No, Zoe’s first book Girl Online became the fastest selling debut novel of all time. Ever. Instead of being happy for the young woman, however, many took to social media and the internet to slate…

View Post
Share:

I have a confession to make, dear readers: I’m a sex critical feminist. I don’t espouse sex positive mantras day in and day out; and I don’t think sex is the most liberating thing in a woman’s life. Before you all burn me at the stake for being the world’s worst feminist, hear me out. I don’t hate sex. I think sex can be great. I think for some people, it can be liberating. And I definitely don’t think women (or anyone of any gender) should be shamed for having sex. But I am sex critical, and I do not believe in sex positivity. Or at least, I don’t believe in it in practice. In theory? Fantastic! It fights back against decades of female sexual expression. It promotes proper sex education; it encourages women to explore their sexualities in a way many never have; it breaks taboos and promotes open,…

View Post
Share:

Note: This review of The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks will be as spoiler-free as possible. — I’m a sucker for a good YA novel – and one of my favourite YA writers of all times has got to be E. Lockhart , aka author of possibly the best YA novel ever written, We Were Liars. But in addition to We Were Liars, E. Lockhart has also written many another book, including the one I want to review today: The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. Boarding school. Secret societies. Elaborate pranks. Feminism. The Disreputable History is everything I could ever want from a book. What made this book for me was the main character – Frankie Landau-Banks. Frankie is attractive. Her parents know it; boys know it; and, most importantly for me, Frankie knows it. Lockhart doesn’t try to pass her off as some kind of plain-yet-boys-are-falling-all-over-her heroine, like most…

View Post
Share: